Dr. Sanford Siegal
April 23, 2008
A Tale of Three (or Four) Cookie Diets

In 1975, I created the concept of a weight loss system that features a special cookie to control hunge...
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April 16, 2008
Cookies, Madonna, and (No) Sex

What a week this is turning out to be. It all began last Sunday evening when my Blackberry started to go crazy...
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January 07, 2008
Hardly a 'Flash in the Pan' Fad

I was on national TV over the weekend. E! Entertainment Network ran a two-hour special about diets that inc...
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October 21, 2007
Can't Seem to Lose Weight No Matter How Little You Eat? Could Be Your Thyroid

Oprah announces to the world that she has a thyroid problem a...
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August 20, 2007
A Simple Cardiovascular Risk Self-Test that Could Save Your Life

I want to share with you a simple, do-it-yourself test to measure your card...
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August 11, 2007
The Magic Pill: Eat What You Want, Lose Weight, and Have Sudden, Unexpected, Explosive Bowel Movements

I don't usually joke about obesity. I...
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July 10, 2007
Dr. Siegal's® COOKIE DIET™ History

Since launching our www.CookieDietOnline.com web site in May, I've received many emails from peop...
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February 18, 2007
I'm Flattered

They say that "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery." Well, I'm feeling very flattered these days. Over the last 35 y...
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Dr. Siegal's Blog
August 20, 2007

A Simple Cardiovascular Risk Self-Test that Could Save Your Life

I want to share with you a simple, do-it-yourself test to measure your cardiovascular risk. This potentially lifesaving self-exam is gaining popularity because it's quick, free, and can be performed at home. I promise that no gigantic and horrendous electronic tunnels are necessary, no needles, no fiendish instruments, and no health insurance-all you need is a tape measure and you're ready to go. This test is not all that new. It first appeared on the scene in the early '90's. Like every new development, it has had its detractors, but the consensus seems to be that it can help to predict if you're a candidate for a heart attack. A lot of doctors know about it, but probably too few take advantage of it. Are you ready? Here's what you do. First let's turn our attention to that tape measure. Make sure it's a good one, not some cheap thing that will stretch and give you the wrong measurements. Next, take off your clothes. (This is probably best performed in the privacy of your own home.) By the way, I highly recommend a "metric" tape measure. That's one that measures in centimeters rather than inches. It will make the later calculation so much easier. You won't have to remember that high school math class that talked about dividing fractions. Where can you get a metric tape measure? Almost anywhere. Try the fabric stores or the sewing shops, or the fabric sections of Wal-Mart, Target, K-Mart, and their ilk. You're going to take only two measurements, your waist and your hips, but let's get it right. Try very hard to apply the same amount of tension for each of the two measurements. No cheating. The idea isn't to get the smallest measurement. You're trying to get a comparison between your waist and your hips. Remember, the same pull on the tape measure for both parts. In both cases you want the biggest measurement for that area. Find the place on you waist where you get the biggest measurement and then do the same for your hips. Mark down the results. Quite simply, you are going to divide your waist measurement by your hip measurement. You're going to hope that the result is less than 1, something like 0.7 or 0.8. If it's over 1, that's not good. It's then time to go to your doctor and tell him that you waist-hip ratio is 1 or more than 1. Let's practice with an example. Let's assume that you're the voluptuous female that you are. Your waist measures 70 centimeters at its widest part and you hips measure 88 centimeters at their widest part. Divide the 70 by 88. Your calculator reads 0.795. That's just fine. That's exactly what you want. Authorities seem to agree that ideally females should have a waist-hip ratio of between 0.7 and 0.8. Above 1.0 is bad. For males, the best number seems to be 0.9. (Have you noticed? Their hips are smaller.) Now what if you can't find a metric tape measure or you're just not receptive to change. You'll probably want to avoid dividing something like 30-1/8 inches by 36-5/8". The solution: round the numbers off to the nearest 1/2' and express it as 0.5 inches. In the example just given, you would divide 30.0 by 36.5 inches and you would get 0.82. You could then jump up and down with joy. But if you are only 5'-2" tall and you weigh 142 pounds, you still have a problem. Get that weight off.